How to Fight The Skin Changes of Menopause

Cynthia Bailey, MD|May 17, 2016


Menopause causes profound changes in a woman's skin. There is a huge loss of skin elasticity in all the skin and paradoxical thickening of the skin on the bottom of a woman’s feet. When a woman starts to fight the loss of skin elasticity BEFORE menopause the benefits are also huge. The most important step is to use daily broad spectrum sunscreen on all sun-exposed skin. This can and will prevent some of the otherwise inevitable skin thinning and fragility. It is crucial to start as soon as possible because UV rays cause a self-perpetuating cascade via skin enzymes called metalloproteinases that results in elastin/collagen degradation. This degradative cascade is potentially indefinite, and when menopausal skin-thinning dog piles onto sun-damaged skin-thinning, the end result is really thin skin! Early intervention has huge impact. Start your sun protection now, no matter what your age. Use the best broad spectrum mineral zinc oxide sunscreens daily. Find one you'll love and never forget to apply here and utilize skin care ingredients like retinoids that actually stop this cascade. This can halt some of the collagen loss and turn the process around to bank collagen/elastin. It will also stimulate your skin’s renewal of collagen, even after menopause. To cover all the interventions possible to fight the skin changes of menopause I build complete skin care routines that combine the best ingredients for the job including:

  1. Retinoids (such as my Retinol Anti-Wrinkle Night Cream)
  2. Glycolic acid (such as my Glycolic Acid Anti-Wrinkle Face Creams)
  3. Antioxidants like green tea and vitamin C (Green Tea Antioxidant Skin Therapy and Vitamin C Professional Treatment Serum)

It's an all-out assault against age related and menopausal skin thinning - and time is of the essence! I give you step by step skin care advice to fight the skin changes of menopause in my new Menopause Skin Care Advice Pages.  It’s what I’ve used myself for years on my pre and post-menopausal skin. It’s also what I’ve recommended to my patients and readers for years. It works!

"Dr. Bailey, you recommended that I should use retin a or a retinoid type product 24 years ago. I am so thankful I followed your advice. I get complements all the time on my skin and I know it is all due to using retinoid products that you recommended. I am looking forward to learning about this new retinoid product! Thank you for all your dermatological words of wisdom."    ~Kristina G, 4/14   "Last year I was visiting the Black hills of South Dakota at an animal safari park.  I was 73 and asked for the senior discount admission rate for 60 and over, and they carded me!  It’s all because of Dr. Bailey, I’ve been her patient for years and she has me doing all these good things for my skin." ~Anonymous  

While the rest of the skin is thinning after menopause, the skin on the feet are doing exactly the opposite!!!  Yep, much to our chagrin, keratoderma climactericum is post-menopausal thickening of foot skin that results in discomfort, painful cracks and unsightly feet. The process is worse if the person also suffer from confounding athlete’s foot or nail fungus. Be sure to treat any fungus while you are younger (always younger today than tomorrow). That's because nail fungus is more likely curable when nails grow faster as they do when we are younger. Controlling skin thickness on feet is important for both looks and comfort. We do it by using exfoliating creams and mechanical filing. This post-menopausal skin problem is often overlooked and misunderstood which is why I made my Rough Skin Foot Remover Kit; it's for we post-menopause gals who love our sandals but whose feet incline themselves to keratoderma climactericum hoofs - not going to happen on our feet!

Have you experienced any of the menopausal skin changes?  Have you tried our suggested routines?  Do you have one you use?  We love hearing your stories in the comments below! 

The information in the Dr. Bailey Skin Care web site, and related links, articles, newsletters and blogs, is provided for general information and educational purposes only. It is the opinion of Dr. Cynthia Bailey, or other indicated authors. Consult your physician or health care provider for any specific medical conditions or concerns you may have. (This also applies to patients in her medical practice; the information here is not a substitute for, or an extension of, the medical care she provides for you.) Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking it because of something you have read here. Use the information and products on this site at your own risk. Use of this site indicates your agreement with these statements and the Terms and Conditions of If you do not agree to all of these Terms and Conditions of use, please do not use this site!

Add Your Comment